Between trend and tradition: these street foods conquer the world!

Love to taste dishes from the world over? Then the term street food is definitely familiar to you. Whether you find yourself in Bangkok or New Delhi, Rome or Nairobi, New Orleans or Seoul, you’ll find a selection of local delicacies to snack on in the street. Nowadays, the booming street food scene means you can discover a banquet of these international dishes without even leaving your home city—or, as you’ll read, your own kitchen!

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Street food refers to drinks and food that sold at markets or from food trucks, carts, or roadside stalls. In most cases you’ll see your dish prepared freshly, right in front of you. What was once considered humble street cuisine has been elevated to global status as more and more people enjoy getting to know traditional from around the world. There’s so much to discover—different countries and the regions and cities within them each have their own specialties and bestsellers to be discovered.

Let’s go on a short trip, shall we? Here are 5 of our favorite street-food inspired recipes from around the world.

Tostadas: Mexican classic with Indian twist

Mexican tostadas are small, crispy tortillas that can be topped with all kinds of delicacies and sold at food markets or at street stands.

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Similar to tacos, tostadas are a colorful bunch. Whether loaded with chicken, minced meat, or even octopus or vegetarian options like beans and avocado salsa, the possibilities are endless. Our current favorite is a cross-over of Mexican and Indian flavors: a spicy Tikka Masala sauce is our delicious secret and gives a special twist to the juicy beef tostadas. Click here to try it out!

Beef tikka masala tostadas

Beef tikka masala tostadas

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Pulled pork burger: Street food meets slow food

The Pulled Pork Burger, and American classic, is a street food star. Eaten with your bare hands, it’s become popular world over at festivals and stalls alike but is deceptively easy to make at home.

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Slow cooking helps the meat become melt-in-your-mouth tender, the true mark of superior pulled pork. To get there, the key factors are ingredients you use for marinating and how long you marinate the meat for. A pulled pork marinade is usually based on apple juice, Worcester sauce, balsamic vinegar and, depending on the recipe, whisky and ketchup. That’s not to say you won’t find twists on the classics: like a punchy honey-mustard marinade. Worked up an appetite already?

To try it yourself, take a look at our Pulled Pork Burger recipe:

Honey-mustard pulled pork sliders

Honey-mustard pulled pork sliders

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Ssambap: Korean salad wraps

Also known as "Ssambap", you might recognize the lettuce-filled wraps from your last Korean BBQ experience.

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Korean-inspired beef lettuce wraps

Korean-inspired beef lettuce wraps

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Our Korean-inspired wraps use Romaine lettuce leaves and fills them with marinated beef or pork belly, rice and various fresh ingredients such as red cabbage, carrots and spring onions. Our recipe splashes a little Thai red curry sauce onto the beef—it's worth trying!

Banh Mi: The baguette that travelled the world

Banh Mi is a Vietnamese baguette that is becoming increasingly popular in western cities such as New York, London and Berlin. It’s a culinary relic of the French colonial era and is typically topped with spicy pork, beef and chicken meat or tofu—there are so many regional varieties to try. Pickled carrots, cucumbers and radishes, as well as sliced chili pepper and herbs like coriander, are a must.

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For this Southeast Asian classic we created an ode to the banh mi with roasted pork belly slices caramelized in a Thai red curry sauce and crisp, pickled radish, cucumber and carrot sticks.

You can find the recipe right here:

Pork belly banh mi

Pork belly banh mi

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Masala Dosa with minty yoghurt

It’s easy to recreate this South Indian specialty at home, especially when you’re entertaining a crowd. The ‘dosa’ batter is made of water, yoghurt, lentil flour and rice flour. They are fried in a pan as you would pancakes and then filled with the filling of your choice.

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We chose a traditional filling of potatoes, sweet potatoes and peas, simmered away in a fragrant Tikka Masala sauce.

Masala dosa with minty yogurt sauce

Masala dosa with minty yogurt sauce

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What is your must-have street food? Let us know in the comments, or share with us your favorite street food finds from your travels. If you have any special recipes of your own that you’d like to see published, send them over to community@kitchenstories.com.