Classic Dishes Around the World is our brand new collaboration with Zwilling. Over the course of a year, we will explore the relationship between global food cultures in 6 dishes to highlight the foods and flavors that bring us together and make our Culinary World more exciting. The dialogue between food cultures worldwide is a source of great inspiration—our goal is to showcase similarities and encourage our ever-more connected world to keep sharing, learning, and adapting the global food landscape.

Eggs exist in almost every household around the world, and rightly so. They’re a miracle ingredient with incredible versatility. They make you strong fried in a pan with a side of spinach and roast potatoes. They help make your mascarpone cream fluffy a rich tiramisu that can impress any guest. Anyone is capable of mastering the technique for perfectly creamy scrambled eggs—so they can invite a bunch of people over for breakfast or brunch without concern. You can incorporate eggs into nearly every single meal–breakfast, lunch, or dinner—and the countries of this world have an endless supply of egg dishes worth cracking open...

Due to the shared global love of eggs and everything they do, it would be impossible to cover every delicious egg dish in only one article—we would probably have to sit together until the end of time to make that happen. So, we will focus on these three favorites: an American Bagel Benedict, Mexican Breakfast tacos with chorizo scrambled eggs, and Thai Khai Yat Sai, a savory stuffed omelette.

We will have a close look at these three variations on cooking with the egg and explore the key factors that make each dish distinct before we will dive deep into how to cook the perfect egg—any way, every time.

Thai Khai Yat Sai (Stuffed omelette with mushrooms)

First, eggs get whisked well with fish sauce before you start to cook them into thin and crispy crepe-like sheets. After that, they’re filled up with a super savory filling and folded into little packages for the plate. The name itself actually says nothing more than “filled egg” in Thai. In Thailand people tend to eat it as a side to spicy curries, but I could definitely enjoy it as a main for breakfast or lunch. The filling usually consists of pork and vegetables, fried over high heat and seasoned generously, but a veggie version is simple and could look like this: Swap fish sauce with soy sauce and pork with a mix of your favorite mushrooms.

Khai yat sai (Thai-style stuffed omelette with mushrooms)

Khai yat sai (Thai-style stuffed omelette with mushrooms)

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American bagel Benedict with smoked salmon and herby hollandaise

The USA should not always be subjected to its somewhat infamous title as the country of fast food, as it’s also perhaps equally well-known as a country of rich indulgence. This bagel Benedict with smoked salmon and herby hollandaise is a great variation of the American brunch classic, and is sumptuously over the top. Eggs Benedict normally has a base of toast or and English muffin and is topped with ham and plain ol’ hollandaise. This version ups the ante with butter slathered toasted bagels, silky smoked salmon, and a fresh hollandaise loaded with herbs. Plus, in case you think we forgot it, a poached egg complete with the necessary runny yolk.

Bagels Benedict with smoked salmon and herby hollandaise

Bagels Benedict with smoked salmon and herby hollandaise

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Mexican chorizo breakfast tacos with salsa verde

Chorizo breakfast tacos with salsa verde

Chorizo breakfast tacos with salsa verde

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They might be called “breakfast tacos” but, to be honest, we could indulge in tacos (especially these ones) any time of day. Tacos a Mexican street food filled with everything you ever want to eat: pork, beef, tomatoes, onions, cilantro, cheese or, like our version, scrambled eggs and spicy chorizo—a coarse-grained pork sausage colored and flavored with paprika. In a lot of cases, tacos are being served with slices of avocado and one or two types of salsa. For this recipe, we opted for a green, slightly bitter salsa with roasted green peppers. Lime, crunchy slices of radish, and thick spoonfuls of sour cream put this recipe over the edge. So, any time of day, whether you have a small or big appetite, this recipe has every taste and consistency covered.

How to cook the perfect egg

As well and good as all the new recipes you have above are, what if you just crave something simple? Like a perfectly poached egg to go alongside a humble slice of toast? Or creamy scrambled eggs to scarf down on the way out the door? Or a fried egg cooked with both a runny yolk and a crispy bottom? Don’t fret, we’ve got you covered.

Poaching an egg always sounds more complicated than it actually is. Three things are certain: Don’t put too much water in your small pot—a little bit higher than an egg will work and is already enough to prevent the egg from floating around too much; you want your water simmering, not boiling uncontrolled; and last but not least, put the egg in the water close to the surface, very carefully to encourage it to cook in a more rounded shape.

If you can’t live without creamy scrambled eggs on the weekend, you probably know all the tricks by now, but for everyone else: Take the eggs off the heat before the eggs are fully cooked. The residual heat from the pan will finish them off perfectly before you add them to a plate and serve.
Poached, scrambled, or fried–here’s how we prepare eggs just right, every time.

Your perfect egg recipe

Now you know how different countries prepare their egg dishes, but which of the three above are you most dying to try? If it’s as hard for you as it is for us to decide, the graphic below might help!

More delicious ideas for you