Everything to Know About Cooking and Shopping for In Season Clementines

Sandra

Contributor

The best way to shop? With the seasons. So, every 2 weeks at Kitchen Stories, we’ll be highlighting a different in-season ingredient along with 3 new recipes. To market, we go!

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Mandarin, clementine, or tangerine? It’s not easy to distinguish these 3 types of citrus fruits, but taking a look on the family tree can help. We’ll tell you everything you need to know about this typical winter fruit and showcase a few new recipes, too.

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What’s your favorite recipe with clementine? Tell us in the comments, and upload a picture of your creations for all to enjoy!

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1. Hello, My Name is Clementine

Clementine’s great-grandmother, the mandarin, came from china and has been grown there for more than 3,000 years. They’re not ideal for storage and transport, which is why it took until the 19th century for them to come to Europe.

The tangerine is a young relative of the clementine, descended from the mandarin; the latter has its name from the monk Clément, who bred it from a cross of mandarin and bitter orange in North Africa. The tangerine is the smallest of the mandarin types and hails from morocco. All three of them have an intense orange color and a sweet aroma. The mandarin has a light sour note and a more formidable core than her relatives.

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2. When and How to Find the Perfect Clementine

Clementine, mandarin, and tangerine are in season from November until February. From Christmas until the New Year the offer is especially great.

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Fresh clementines have a strong fragrance and a shiny peel without wrinkles. To be sure that the peel is untreated, get your fruit in the bio department. But in any case, wash it before using.

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3. How to Store Clementines

Keep them cool but not too cool. Better store them in your basement or cold corridor, not in the fridge. To avoid marks and mold, store them side by side. Mandarins remain fresh from one to two weeks, a clementine or tangerine even longer. A dry pulp and bitter flavor is a hint for over-ripeness.

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4. Why to Buy Clementines This Winter

Because they are high in vitamin C, clementine, mandarin, and tangerine boost your immune system and are ideal partners in winter. They contain most of the vitamins that prevent a cold. Three to four fruits cover the daily dose. And you get calcium, folic acid, vitamin A for skin and eyes, and vitamin B against the winter blues as a bonus.

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5. What to Make Next

All week long, we’ll be featuring new clementine recipes on Kitchen Stories. Check back to see what’s new, then try one for yourself! Here’s where to start:

Pork tenderloin with clementine-sage sauce

Pork tenderloin with clementine-sage sauce

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Ricotta clementine cakes

Ricotta clementine cakes

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Clementine endive salad with candied pecans

Clementine endive salad with candied pecans

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